Dear students: you are so much more than a test score

March 12, 2014

in hot topics

The following true story made the rounds in social media this fall, but I wanted to share it with you now in the spring as so many of us suffer through “testing season” and anxiously await the return of standardized test scores. An elementary school principal sent this message to all her students during the week they got their scores back:

We are concerned that these tests do not always assess all of what it is that make each of you special and unique. The people who create these tests and score them do not know each of you— the way your teachers do, the way I hope to, and certainly not the way your families do.

They do not know that many of you speak two languages.

They do not know that you can play a musical instrument or that you can dance or paint a picture.

They do not know that your friends count on you to be there for them or that your laughter can brighten the dreariest day.

They do not know that you write poetry or songs, play or participate in sports, wonder about the future, or that sometimes you take care of your little brother or sister after school.

They do not know that you have traveled to a really neat place or that you know how to tell a great story or that you really love spending time with special family members and friends.

They do not know that you can be trustworthy, kind or thoughtful, and that you try, every day, to be your very best…

The scores you get will tell you something, but they will not tell you everything. There are many ways of being smart.

Spread the word to students that they are more than a test score

A teacher is more than a set of test scores, too. But in our haste to make that point to legislators and administrators and the public in general, let’s not forget the smallest victims of our test-driven school culture. Let’s show kids that we are on their side, and that we know being defined by test scores is stressful for them, as well.

what matters most is not necessarily tested

Let’s spread the message to the kids we teach that they’re worth so much more than what a single standardized test says they are. Their most important qualities won’t be measured in a multiple choice math or reading exam. Let’s remind students that that we, their teachers, care about them as people, that we value each of their unique contributions in the classroom, and that we understand there is so much more to their world than what we see glimpses of in a few short hours each school day.

Einstein quote

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Angela Watson was a classroom teacher for 11 years and has turned her passion for helping other teachers into a career as an educational consultant based in Brooklyn, NY. As founder of Due Season Press and Educational Services, she has published 3 books, launched a blog and webinar series, designs curriculum resources, and conducts seminars in schools around the world. Check out the free teacher resource pages for photos, tips & tricks, activities, printables, and more.

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Elisa Waingory March 12, 2014 at 8:24 pm

Thank you for sharing this, Angela. Very powerful. Our society’s obsession with numbers and rankings has done nothing to prove the quality of life. When will we learn that what matters can’t be counted and the beauty in that is what we should be celebrating?

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2 Bryan Beaton March 12, 2014 at 11:48 pm

I LOVED this post, Angela. It stopped me in my tracks as I was doing my ‘quick run through today’s email’. And the timing couldn’t have been better.
Class IX and X students in two schools we work with here (West Bengal, India) are facing ‘Board Exams’ the results of which could close or open doors for them for many years to come. While we want to impress upon these students the significance of their current study efforts, these schools also actively seek to foster the development of broader personal qualities. Your post gives me an opportunity to encourage a broader perspective within the study-skills workshops we are offering as their (Feb – Dec) new school year begins. So … I’ve shared your post as a printout here in our staffrooms and in the Class IX and X classrooms.

Thank you for sharing this inspiration.

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