Learn how to create and implement math games quickly and inexpensively!  On this page, you’ll find photos of math games and free printable directions for several of them.  You can see how to store and organize these math partner games and introduce them to your class on the Starting Math Game Routines page.

Teacher-made math games for grades 2-4

Remember, even if you don’t use math partner games, you can still use the activities below as centers, in small groups, or as whole class games! Click on any picture to enlarge it and read the directions.

mathtubmemory

Division Memory

mathtubfacto

Facto: Basic Math Fact Practice

mathtubpassout

Pass Out (Multiplication Practice)

mathtubspeed

Speed (basic fact practice, any operations students know)

mathtubthreeinarow

Three In A Row (A game of logic and strategy)

mathtubbattledirections

Battle (basic fact practice, any operations)

mathtubaddemupdirections

Add ‘Em Up (multiplication/division facts)

mathtubdice1000directions

Dice 1000 (3 digit addition and 3 digit multiplication)

mathtubdivisiongofishdirections

Division Go Fish (division fact practice)

mathtubtimed5cardoperation

Timed 5 Card Operations (all math operations students know/ fact families)
There is also an untimed version.

mathtubpastaarrays

Printable math partner games for Common Core

I am in the process of creating printable directions for the games above and many, many more! If you don’t have the time and energy to make your own centers, just purchase and print these out–they’re ready to use!

So far, I’ve made math games for every Common Core domain for grades 1-5 (Operations and Algebraic Thinking, Number and Operations in Base Ten, Fractions, and Geometry) with the exception of Measurement and Data. Info on each is below.

After numerous requests, I have finally made a printable set of multiplication KITs and addition KITs!  Each download is 171 total pages and is available for $4.50. They include the recording sheets with directions for each KIT, instructions for making the KITs, game boards and game cards, and more. You can download a free preview to see everything that’s included before you buy. I really appreciate your support!

Commercially-bought games

Below are commercially-bought games that took a very short time to turn into math tub activities/partner games.

mathtubclevercatchball

Clever Catch Ball: Students toss this beach ball gently back and forth; whatever math problem their left thumb lands on, they have to solve. I have one for each of the four math operations. You can also buy plain beach balls at the dollar store and write on them yourself with permanent marker. You can program the balls with parts of speech, countries/capitals, vocabulary words, spelling words (read the word aloud to the partner and they must spell it correctly)… the possibilities are endless! Be sure to have students model how to toss and how not to toss the ball, and don’t be afraid to put away this activity if students get too wild with it.

mathtubmultiplicationbingo2

Many teachers have math bingo games, either store bought or handmade. Pull a few bingo cards from your supply, along with extra chips/ place holders and photocopies of the fact problem cards and you’re ready to go! Students put the fact problem cards in a face-down stack and flip them over one at a time, covering the numbers on their boards as corresponding math problems are shown. The first one with a completely full board wins.

Turn a worksheet into a hands-on game!

mathtubexpandedformdicegame

Even worksheets can make great centers and math tubs! The only problem is you must keep a supply of photocopies. About once a month, put a center helper in charge of checking worksheet centers and math tubs to be sure they have enough copies. The student can pull one copy of the sheets that are running low and place it in your file or basket of papers to take to the photocopier. Also, some worksheets are simple enough that older students can copy the graphic organizer or framework onto their own paper. This worksheet is an example of one simple enough that some students could make themselves, especially if you did not require that they copy the pictures of the die.

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